Kathryn Everest & Students Talk Bullying

Kathryn Everest & Students Talk Bullying

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Bullying is pervasive, severe, and persistent, and it is affecting the lives of our teenagers. This episode, Chris and Karlie are joined by Fort Worth ISD’s Director of Guidance and Counseling, Kathryn Everest, and several students to talk about bullying. Listen as they share stories, hurt and ways to create a better environment on school campuses. We don’t need to panic about bullying, but we also can’t keep quiet or ignore it. Find out how you can help combat bullying!  

In this episode, you’ll find out…
  • What the definition of bullying is and what it looks like.
  • How social media has affected bullying.
  • Real stories of how bullying has affected teenagers.
  • Some things parents can do to help teens with bullying.
  • How the school can help students who are being bullied.
  • Ways students are working to change the climate on their school campuses.
Ask yourself…
  • Am I being aware of the needs and hurts of this student?
  • How can I create a climate of respect and safety among students?
Go ask a teen…
  • Is everything okay? What’s going on?
  • How has that person or those words hurt you? What can we do to help?
Resources:

In this episode, we mentioned the following resources:

About Us:

Kathryn Everest is in her 22nd year as Director of Guidance and Counseling for the Fort Worth Independent School District. Kathryn is recognized for her innovative and comprehensive implementation of crisis response in schools and communities. Everest is one of the best in her field as Kathryn’s wide range of experiences, coupled with her own unique perspective and insight intuitively and strategically addresses today’s ever changing issues as an advocate for students.

Chris Robey is the Program Director for Teen Life. Earlier in his career while working as a youth minister, Chris earned a Masters Degree in Family Life Education from Lubbock Christian University to better equip his work with teenagers and families. Chris’ career and educational opportunities have exposed him to teenagers from a variety of backgrounds. Follow him on Twitter!

Karlie Duke started working as Teen Life’s Communications Director after graduating from Abilene Christian University with a degree in Communications with a minor in Family Studies. Karlie has worked with teenagers for the past 5 years and is passionate about encouraging students to live better stories. Follow her on Twitter or Instagram!

Have a question?
If you have a question about something you heard or just want to give us some feedback, please leave us a comment below.  We would love to hear from you!
Don’t Panic About Self-Harm with Shannon Herman

Don’t Panic About Self-Harm with Shannon Herman

In this episode, we talk to Shannon Herman, a Licensed Professional Counselor, about self-harm, how to recognize the signs and how to respond to a teen who self-injures. While this can be a heavy and sometimes upsetting topic, we need to be able to have conversations about self-harm to better equip teenagers with different coping skills. Take a deep breath and don’t panic about self-harm…you’ve got this!

 

In this episode, you’ll find out…

  • Several types of self-harming behaviors seen among teenagers.
  • What ages and genders engage in self-injurious behaviors.
  • Some presenting issues and warning signs behind self-harm (hint: it’s not always the cat!)
  • The importance of confronting a self-harming teenager.
  • Some positive ways to react to self-injurious behavior.
  • What steps to take after discovering self-harming behaviors.

Ask yourself…

  • Am I paying attention to warning signs and behavior changes?
  • How would I react if a teen revealed self-injurious marks to me?
  • Am I listening? Am I available?

 

Go ask a teen…

  • What triggers you to self-harm? What do you have on your mind right before you do that?
  • What do you hope the end result will be when you are self-injuring?
  • Can I see the places where you have hurt yourself?
You’re not there to be that teen’s friend, you’re there to potentially save their life - @dontpanictalk Click To Tweet

Additional Resources:

In this episode, we mentioned the following resources:

 

About us: 

Shannon Herman has been in private practice in the Dallas-Fort Worth area for over four years as a Licensed Professional Counselor. Her focus is on issues related to adult and adolescent women such as: eating disorders, body image concerns, depression, anxiety/stress management and low-self esteem. As a mom of 2 girls and wife of a Youth Minister, Shannon is dedicated to motivating and empowering clients to stimulate change within their life. Find her website here!

 

Chris Robey is the Program Director for Teen Lifeline, Inc. Earlier in his career while working as a youth minister, Chris earned a Masters Degree in Family Life Education from Lubbock Christian University to better equip his work with teenagers and families. Chris’ career and educational opportunities have exposed him to teenagers from a variety of backgrounds. Follow him on Twitter!

 

Karlie Duke started working as Teen Lifeline’s Communications Director after graduating from Abilene Christian University with a degree in Communications with a minor in Family Studies. Karlie has worked with teenagers for the past 5 years and is passionate about encouraging students to live better stories. Follow her on Twitter or Instagram!

 
 

 

Have a question?

 If you have a question about something you heard or just want to give us some feedback, please leave us a comment below.  We would love to hear from you!

 

 

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7 Kids Isn’t For You

7 Kids Isn’t For You

Occasionally, I am privileged to speak to a group of teenaged parents. I appreciate these opportunities because I can’t imagine being a high school student and a parent. Just being a parent is hard enough.

When introducing myself, one of the things I choose to do is to tell the group that my wife and I have 4 kids at our house. I then show a picture of 7 kids (see below) and explain that for the time being we have 3 extra kids living with us. Who they are and why is for another time.

I usually say something to the effect of, “I don’t recommend having 7 kids. It isn’t for everyone.” And I mean it. What inevitably happens when I show 7 kids on the screen as I am teaching a class on internet and social media is that some assumptions are made. I do not want one of these assumptions to be that we have it all together. Because often, we don’t.

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So what do I want them to hear?

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